Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for November, 2010

Jess, Figure 2, A Field of Pumpkins Grown for Seed: Translation #11, from the Nelson Atkins museum of art.

Great article by Jed Perl weighing out some conflicting values: the need for a diverse, eclectic  production versus the need for rigorous standards for understanding that may necessarily have to be based on older, more limited ideals.  Well worth reading.

 

Read Full Post »

Ed Valentine

Ed Valentine

Read Full Post »

Deb Sokolow at Western Exhibtions, November 19-December 31, 2010.

Read Full Post »

Philosophy Prof. Denis Dutton on a Darwinian Theory of Beauty at Ted (with some cool animation by Andrew Park).

Read Full Post »

Ken Kewley will visit University of Arkansas Fort Smith and the Fort Smith Regional Art Museum (formerly the Fort Smith Art Center) for lectures and workshops.  Lecture Friday, Nov 19, at 7pm, Gardner Lecture Hall, UAFS campus.  More information here and here. Kewley was featured recently on Painting Perceptions and the Jerusalem Studio School blog.

Read Full Post »

Archie Scott Gobber: Super Power at Dolphin Gallery, November 12, 2010-January 8, 2011.

From the press release:  “In his latest solo show, Archie Scott Gobber continues to skewer popular culture, from America itself, down to the individual citizen. He taps into the cultural anxieties resulting from current economic woes and political failings to examine contemporary social polarities.”

Read Full Post »

Nathan Boyer’s “Mystery Talk” at Index Magazine.

Thomas Nozkowski at Brooklyn Rail (via everywhere by this point, but Two Coats of Paint specifically): “You mix it, beat it, and layer it. It is never pure and—a commonplace—it is always seen in context, changed and charged by its size, position, and relationships with other colors. It is slippery stuff, the most elusive part of painting. I like it best in excess, when it feels like it is about to go out of control.”

“Teaching Close Encounters” by Matthew Ballou over at Neoteric Art: “…skill and intuition are inseparable. Skill is not the tool of repressive patriarchal power structures, not an instance of intellectual gate-keeping designed to concentrate power or opportunity in one class or demographic. Certain skills may once have been used that way, and some may still find themselves bastardized to some degree, but this is not a state inherent to skills as such. Skills are, instead, democratic and cumulative; we inherit them from others and build on them ourselves.”

Some Timothy Callaghan over at Hello My Name Is Art.

Some recent profiles at Review Online:  Warren Rosser and Julie Farstad.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »