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Posts Tagged ‘Sedalia Missouri Art’

Sharon Patten ReceptionSharon Patten, “Reception” (installation view at the Daum Museum), 96″ x 84″, oil on canvas, 1994

Sharon Patten’s paintings are currently the subject of a survey at the Daum Museum of Art in Missouri.  Most of these paintings date from the last decade of Patten’s life. At the time of her death Patten was starting to receive national attention for her large-scale, thickly painted work.  Sharon Patten died in 1995 at the age of 52.  She was the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, was showing  in New York City and Kansas City, and garnered positive reviews from Art in America.  A native of the small town of Sedalia, Missouri, it’s fitting that the Daum Museum there is currently the foremost resource about her life and work.  Sharon Patten: An Independent Vision is on view until August 30th, 2015.

Patten’s paint is heavy, applied with a knife and so thick that the paintings frequently look different up close than from a distance.  Figure and ground relationships that seem insistent from 10 feet away dissolve when the viewer moves in for a closer look.  An outline can be literally obscured by a passage of impasto.  And for all the physicality of the paintings, the role of design seems critical to the experience of these paintings.  As does the role of metaphor.  Patten herself was clear about the importance of metaphor in her work.  It’s discussed in a quote from the artist posted on the gallery wall, and in titles of many of the paintings: “Concurrence”, “Experience”, “Aplomb”, “Success”, etc.  For Patten abstraction was a form and a behavior.

Given the physicality and surface complexity of these paintings, I felt the only way to write about them was to open up a conversation with other painters also able to see the work in person.  It was the excitement of Boonville, Missouri-based artist, Chris Fletcher, that prompted me to make the drive out to see the exhibit.  Fletcher then suggested an artist from Columbia, Missouri, Jennifer Wiggs, to be the third voice in our conversation.  The three of us exchanged a few emails discussing our experience of Sharon Patten’s work.

Christopher Lowrance:  To start, I’ve been thinking about my drive to work, an hour through the countryside, and the way that, after 8 years of it, I know the land. It’s not the particulars, which are always changing. Trees fall down, buildings (more…)

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