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Posts Tagged ‘Abstract Painting’

 

Buoyant-4, acrylic on canvas, 40_ X 40_, 2016

MWC friend Emil Robinson has written a review of Frank Hermann’s exhibit “The Liminal Landscape” at Marta Hewett Gallery in Cincinnati.  Here’s a link to the review.

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Damon Freed What Babies Art Made Of

Damon Freed, “What Babies Are Made Of”, 2014, oil and acrylic on canvas, 72″ x 72″

 

Today’s installment of “On Finishing” comes from painter Damon Freed.  Freed’s production is varied–painting, drawing, poetry, art writing–and this short interview  touches on most of those.   Freed has recently exhibited at Bruno David Gallery in St. Louis and Sherry Leedy Gallery in Kansas City.

 

Are you a good closer?

I am sometimes. With the nonobjective work it’s often about two things. How empty can I get the painting to be while working it enough to feel finished, and on the other hand, how packed full of stuff can I get the painting to be without it feeling forced or labored. It’s different with the representational work. I work from a source when working representationally. I have a charcoal study that serves as the structure for the painting, and the marks in the drawings provide energy and inspiration for color. So, I’m trying to not lose what the drawing has and at the same time I try to let the painting be autonomous. But yes, I am often sure when it’s finished.

Is it easy or difficult for you to be finished with a piece?  Do you make a clean break or let it go kicking and screaming?

I try to make a clean break, and often do. But, I must say, it’s rarely easy. You work and you work until the piece can hold no more, and that’s when I stop. Or else I work it just a little past that point, and then have to edit a bit. Or, I work it way past that point, and lose the painting entirely. The funny thing about painting is that it is an additive process, you know, there’s no erasing. Although, some marks you lay down can negate others you’ve already applied, others that you perhaps don’t want anymore. So, you work with every attempt to hide the previous marks without the painting feeling labored.

When you call it done are you smiling?  Is your relationship to finishing troubling to you at all?

I’m smiling on the good ones but the good ones, I mean, the ones that really fill you up inside are far and few between. A gentle, quiet smile is more often the case with the smaller works, but when you nail a big one, you know you’ve done some real good. And you feel as though the stars have aligned for you and that all will be well for a time and it is.

How do you see yourself compared to your peers, in terms of how easily you call an artwork finished?  How much does the idea of calling things finished affect the type of painting you make or how you define yourself as a painter?

I feel as though it must be every bit as difficult for my peers to finish as it is for me, unless of course they are much younger, and in that case, it must be more difficult. The thing with art making, it seems to me, is that you get closer to your successes and failures the longer you’ve been working, which means you know better when you have succeeded, and you know better when you have failed. You know more about what you want and how to achieve what you want. It’s very hard to do so at a young age; what’s in your mind and on the canvas can be quite disparate things.

As far as the finish affecting the type of painting I do – it makes all the difference. I used to work very tight, and the finish was seductive–the final appearance that is. I would hide the pencil lines, the history of mark making, and everything I thought would lend a painting to a fresh and easy read. Well, in the end, to me that kind of painting was not only stressful to do, but stressful to look at because as a painter when looking for the painting’s history I was held out from the process, how it came into being. For me, and for some others, I know that there is some pleasure derived from the transparency of a painting’s process. And now my work is looser, the marks are more fancy-free. So it’s all right there on the surface; how it’s made and how it came into being.

Any other thoughts on finishing?

Just this one thing – I wrote this brief notation on finishing not too terribly long ago. It still serves as a good analogy, I think, for the way I work. Here it is…

I think making a painting is like packing a suitcase for a long sustained journey. How do I fit everything I need into this rectangular or irregular bulging bag and still zip the zipper? Finishing a painting is this way. How do I carefully cram everything I want inside without the zipper breaking! You try to zip it once or twice before everything is in just to see where you’re at and once it starts to get snug and a little harder to zip you know it’s getting close and the decision making gets real important. That’s when you have to really start to negotiate the necessities for your trip, what is sustainable and needed, what can go, and what have I forgotten? It gets even tighter! Finally, you make a last attempt to zip that zipper and it either closes or it breaks. If it breaks, unfortunately, you have to buy a new suitcase. It sucks, you’re anxiety ridden, pissed off, and you might miss your flight. But damn if it doesn’t make you a better packer!

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Full Phase

“Full Phase”, 2014, oil on canvas, 78″ x 96″

Eric Sall returns to Kansas City with an exhibit, Full Phase, at Haw Contemporary.  Sall is an artist we have followed for a long time.  We have discussed enthusiastically here on MWC; and we reprinted an interview he conducted with late Kansas City artist Lester Goldman, but we have never spoken to Sall himself.  With this new ambitious body of work, it seemed like time to reach out.  The paintings in Full Phase has a lot in common with the paintings he’s made in the past.  The Day Glo colors, stripes, gooey paint, more stripes are all there. He’s also absorbed some new forms.   The most exciting new twists evoke traditional blankets and patchwork quilts.  Key parts of the interview that follows discuss his process and the material parts of his paintings.  I want to thank Dennis Helsel for suggesting a question or two in this interview.

 Please give our readers a little bit of information about yourself.

I grew up in the small city of Sioux Falls, South Dakota. In high school I lived out in the Black Hills in the Lead-Deadwood area, where Western legends Wild Bill Hickok and Calamity Jane used to reside. I then went to the Kansas City Art Institute for college and later on went to [Virginia Commonwealth University] for my Master’s in painting.

 Many of us don’t grow up with painting and art as part of our daily life, our routes into the fine arts are circuitous.  Was that your experience?  How and when did you say, ‘I’m going to do this’?

I always loved to draw as a child but I probably really got into art through skateboarding. I was pretty bad at traditional sports so it makes sense that I was so drawn to the culture of skateboarding which seemed to embrace all the “different” kids, especially back  in the late 80’s/early 90’s when skateboarding was more counterculture. Plus my older sister Emily was hanging out with all the punks and skaters and I desperately wanted to be cool like her and her friends. It turned out that I was actually pretty good at skateboarding, and like most teens I thought I could become pro and that was my dream. Skateboarding introduced me to new forms of music and different styles of visual art, and most importantly it gave me a sense of independence, focus and determination that I hadn’t had before. That is probably when I first started thinking like an artist without even knowing it. A big part of skateboarding is about learning your way through constant exposure, absorption, interpretation, trial and error, and lots of failure. In a way it is very similar to painting.

Coinciding with that, I attended a pretty small high school but I had a fantastic art teacher who gave me a lot of freedom in class to try knew things. I remember having huge amounts of Utrecht oil paint available to us, and I was one of the kids who liked to use a lot of it up, so I was experimenting with texture and surface and process all through my four years of high school. I knew about the Kansas City Art Institute after having spent a year living in KC during my early teen years, and I basically just assumed that I would go there after high school. Fortunately I got in because it was the only college I applied to.

Frazada

“Frazada”, 2014, oil on canvas, 48″ x 36″

What is a day in the studio like for you?

 I don’t have a set routine as far as hours spent working or anything like that, but I do have a routine when I get in there.  I change into work clothes, put on my Crocs, put on some music and then just get busy. Sometimes I have to clean up a mess left behind from a previous session. Or sometimes I just want to spend some time looking at what I’m working on.  I don’t have a lot of leisure time in my studio so I try to make the most efficient use of any time I get. My wife [Rachel Hayes] is an artist too and we have two small kids at home still. We both work full time on our art, so we have to find a balance of being in the studio and being with the kids that is pretty organic. Sometimes I go for weeks not being in the studio if Rachel is working on a deadline and vice versa, but that is okay, because there is always plenty of work to do that doesn’t necessarily take place in the studio. Emailing, researching, working on applications, sourcing materials, running errands, etc, etc etc.

Tell us about one useful thing you were taught or told.

How to build a stretcher. Something we were taught as sophomore painters at the Kansas City Art Institute. I made my own stretchers for years, and then when I lived in Brooklyn I payed someone to make my stretchers out of pure convenience. Time is everything there and I never seemed to have enough. But there is something deeply satisfying about building your own great stretchers and I’m happy to have made several recently.

What is the hard part of painting for you?

Walking away from a painting and calling it finished.

What is the fun part?

The beginning of a painting, making the first moves on a new canvas.

What are you getting better at?

Walking away from a painting and calling it finished.

Are you an improviser?

Definitely.

Hodgepodge

“Hodgepodge”, 2014, oil, acrylic and charcoal on canvas, 78″ x 96″

A friend suggested I ask what your thoughts are on the current state of abstract painting.  It’s a great question, but let’s put it a little less “wide angle.”  Thinking about larger contexts; about the ideas and forms being used or neglected by current abstract painters; about pressures to be allied with, or opposed to the work or motivations of one’s contemporaries– how useful is that to you?  Does that way of thinking have a role in your work?  

 I definitely like to be aware of what’s going on with contemporary painting and think it is important to know about, especially since I have been living in the middle of nowhere for a while. But honestly it has almost zero affect on me in the studio. I actually make better work when I’m not obsessing about other painters or comparing my work to other work. There is just so much work being made now, good and bad, abstract and not, painting or whatever. And we can see it all so easily online, on our phones, on Instagram. Sometimes I see work that I think of as being a similar type as mine, and then I see work that seems so different than mine. I think you kind of find the things that you’re drawn to and that move you regardless. I guess I’ve never really felt like I had to take a stance against a certain type of painting or had to align myself with a certain group. I just don’t think it is that important anymore.  

Your paintings overall have kind of a friendly, playful, maybe nostalgic vibe.  But there’s often a little gritty, grungy bit in there some where, in terms of color or texture, things that look wiped down or scraped out.  I am curious to know more about those bits.  Is this something that’s done totally intentionally, like you walk into the studio one day and say, “now I’m painting the messy part?”  Or is it more a part of the process, evidence of an earlier state that’s been interrupted or overridden?

It’s a little bit of both, but I might describe it a little differently. I  wouldn’t say that it is an attempt to paint the “messy” part per se, but there are times where I feel like things need to be agitated in a way…that could mean doing something like dragging thick paint over the top of a flatly-painted area, or scraping out a specific shape in order to obscure it somehow. These things also happen when I think something is failing in a painting and I just want to wipe things away or scrape off bad areas. It is just a gut reaction, and often those bits are just a real part of the process. Wet paint drips. Thick paint clumps. Colors bleed into each other and make new colors. Sometimes chunks fall down and land somewhere else on the canvas. But then I’ll do something intentional like painting a hard-edged geometric shape on top of an area of thick texture or heavy impasto. It is a constant dance between intention and accident, and that is one of the reasons why I am such an improviser.   

eric-sall-grey-painting

“Grey Painting”, 2013, oil on canvas, 66″ x 50″

Is there anything else we should be asking you about, that’s relevant to your work right now?  Do you ever see deer in your front yard, or where’s the best place for coffee around there, anything like that we should know about?

I’ve been living in Roswell, NM since last summer with my wife Rachel Hayes and our two kids while Rachel and I attended the Roswell Artist-in-Residence program. The compound is pretty rural, all of the houses and studios sit in the middle of 40 acres of desert brush landscape. So yes, we do see deer, fox, roadrunners, lots of lizards, scorpions, tarantulas and plenty of other exciting stuff! There is an incredible sense of open space here, which for me feels great. I feel very free in life and very focused in my studio. But that will inevitably change and who knows what the effect will be. We seem to move somewhere new every year or two, and from here we are moving to Tulsa, OK for another residency where we will live and work right downtown, and I know that will have a different influence on my work. Each place does.

 

Thank you, Eric!  Best luck on the show!

 

Read more MWC artist interviews here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sharon Patten ReceptionSharon Patten, “Reception” (installation view at the Daum Museum), 96″ x 84″, oil on canvas, 1994

Sharon Patten’s paintings are currently the subject of a survey at the Daum Museum of Art in Missouri.  Most of these paintings date from the last decade of Patten’s life. At the time of her death Patten was starting to receive national attention for her large-scale, thickly painted work.  Sharon Patten died in 1995 at the age of 52.  She was the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, was showing  in New York City and Kansas City, and garnered positive reviews from Art in America.  A native of the small town of Sedalia, Missouri, it’s fitting that the Daum Museum there is currently the foremost resource about her life and work.  Sharon Patten: An Independent Vision is on view until August 30th, 2015.

Patten’s paint is heavy, applied with a knife and so thick that the paintings frequently look different up close than from a distance.  Figure and ground relationships that seem insistent from 10 feet away dissolve when the viewer moves in for a closer look.  An outline can be literally obscured by a passage of impasto.  And for all the physicality of the paintings, the role of design seems critical to the experience of these paintings.  As does the role of metaphor.  Patten herself was clear about the importance of metaphor in her work.  It’s discussed in a quote from the artist posted on the gallery wall, and in titles of many of the paintings: “Concurrence”, “Experience”, “Aplomb”, “Success”, etc.  For Patten abstraction was a form and a behavior.

Given the physicality and surface complexity of these paintings, I felt the only way to write about them was to open up a conversation with other painters also able to see the work in person.  It was the excitement of Boonville, Missouri-based artist, Chris Fletcher, that prompted me to make the drive out to see the exhibit.  Fletcher then suggested an artist from Columbia, Missouri, Jennifer Wiggs, to be the third voice in our conversation.  The three of us exchanged a few emails discussing our experience of Sharon Patten’s work.

Christopher Lowrance:  To start, I’ve been thinking about my drive to work, an hour through the countryside, and the way that, after 8 years of it, I know the land. It’s not the particulars, which are always changing. Trees fall down, buildings (more…)

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blurb-4

John Berry, “Beserker”, 2015, oil and spray paint on panel, 8″ x 10″

Here is a second, long overdue (Sorry, John!) response to our new prompt, asking an artist to think of three questions she or he might ask of her or his future self.  This time the artist is John Berry, a young painter living in Greencastle, IN.  The artist chose to approach the response by coming up with a list of questions and providing a short explanation as to why he wants to know.  Berry’s most recent show is Image Loading on view at DePauw University in Greencastle last spring.  You can see more of his work at his website.

Are you still using paint?

It is less and less obvious to me why I should use paint, (more…)

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Kelley Johnson: Recent Paintings at Bruno David Gallery in St. Louis, September 10-November 6, 2010.

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lief-kathuntitled06_s

Leif Kath

Oh, those melancholy Danes.  Despite the truly awful title, 2D or Not 2D: Danish Artists Flirt With Space (at the UCMO Gallery of Art & Design) is actually one of the better shows in the area right now.  These are mostly smallish, shy paintings; some a little obtuse, some a little too pleasing.  A little too warm, a little too cool, yes, but never lukewarm.  It’s all balance.  The real discovery for me has been Leif Kath, a mid career academic just starting to show in the US.  Kath’s thin, soft paintings wear Formalism lightly.  It’s a slightly-complex-board-game-you-play-with-your-family-on-the-day-after-Christmas formalism.  Nothing Puritanical.  Possibly transcendent nonetheless.

2d-or-not-2d-bodilnielsen1_000

Bodil Nielsen

2d-or-not-2d-guldbeck1

Mille Guldbeck

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